Thursday, November 22, 2012

For the Arachnophiles +

This is a continuation of my previous post, where i have been peeping into the canopy or under canopy of plants. These are mostly the spiders that I normally did not see in my daily walks. They are mostly seen in the mornings, when our temperature is not yet so hot. I guess they hide among the leaves when the sun rises. Sometimes, going into the orchard is a bit yucky because of these spider webs, which are sticky to body and clothing. When that happens, unless the owner of the web is so big, I don't bother to look how the owner looks like. This time, I really looked for them, waited and extremely patient for the wind to stop, so I can at least get at least a decent photo. 

I just learned from the arachnophile FB page here, that many of these creatures with 4 pairs of legs are still unnamed. And they are not easy to identify, as a lot of characteristics mostly microscopic have to be considered in the classification. An authority said they will still work on those living in the tree canopy, those under the canopy, and the ground dwellers. I guess it is easier for plants than these spiders. Maybe that's the reason a lot of them here in the country still don't have scientific names. They further said, it is safer to stop at the Genus level at the moment. 



 I saw this one under the crotons and hibiscus leaves. I guess they call this within the Gasteracantha genus!


 This one doesn't have a big web, but i caught it dangling from its thread in space. They assume this is under the genus Poltys.

 Above and below seems unusual because it carry its abdomen uncharacteristically oblique. Its body is just one cm long, so very difficult for me to focus with the light wind. The abdomen looks like a cone shell and very colorful too.
 It is within the genus Opadometa.

 I have always posted this one in the past, as they are very conspicuous in our area. The webs are big and made in between the trees mostly above our heads. The adults are about 2-3 inches in length when fully mature. This belongs to the Nephilia genus.

 Most, if not all, spiders have this ability to produce the sticky sap on their abdomen. This is the facility for making their web. It is my first time to scrutinize that portal called spinnerets, where the sticky web comes out. I wonder why that area is very colorful too, not similar to the color of the body. If only I am close to an arachnologist, I will be so glad to join in the lab and look at these structures in the microscope! Oh how enchanting our world really is!

Camera Critters Meme

29 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. My appreciation for your visit ladyfi!

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  2. Replies
    1. Oh really Mark, do you see improvement in my shots? Thanks!

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  3. Exciting study of spiders ~ great info and fantastic photography ~ (A Creative Harbor) ^_^

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    1. Thank you so much for you kind words and visit.

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  4. You got some fantastic photos. It's so hard to focus on them as their webs sway in the wind. Close up they are really quite beautiful and they do a good job in the garden keeping insects under control.

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    1. Oh yes exactly right Missy. It is so difficult waiting when the web will just move very slightly with the wind. And when the spider moves, it takes a long time to stop! hahaha

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  5. Hi Andrea, you have some great shots here. The spiders that you have around your area have such gorgeous colours. The spider in the second and third photos is star-shaped. The second last photo is my favourite with the colourful bokeh and gleaming net.

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    1. Thanks Stiletto, I am actually just starting to delve into their world, starting with photos!

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  6. Andrea,
    Cool spiders especially the spiny one, we have one that is shaped very close to that one.

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    1. Even here Randy, one genus is composed of hundreds or thousand species. I guess I wont ran out of subjects.

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  7. I would be too afraid to go out into the garden with all of that going on. I wonder what message it is trying to convey with the yellow stripes.

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    1. Yes b-a-g, i confess I am not familiar with insects although i know some common names, but when it comes to spiders, they are totally alien to me! I guess there are few arachnologists than botanists, horticulturists or plant physiologists, hahaha! At least I am now trying to picture them, which i haven't done yet.

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  8. I am not a fan of spiders, but I have to admit that this is a beauty! Very interesting series!
    :)

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  9. I tend to ignore the spiders - neither of my daughters like spiders, and if I take the photos, I want to post them, yet no upset my kids. (They are adults - why do I still protect them?) But I do like seeing what other people capture! My favourite shot of these, is the first one, with the sunlight glancing off the web!!!
    You asked about the seeds in my avatar photo. They are from a plant called cow parsnip, very pretty to look at, but the sap is a phototoxin. If you get it on your skin and let it expose to sunlight, you end up with really painful chemical burns that last several weeks, and scar for months. It has been almost 4 months, and I don't think the scars have diminished at all...

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  10. Great series!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  11. I think spiders are fascinating. You show quite a variety here.

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  12. Fascinating and the color is so spectacular!

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  13. Unbelievable pics of these spiders...you do have the most lovely and creepy spiders.

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  14. Amazing! Beautiful photos of this very interesting spider.

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  15. You are brave.....I think spider webs are so intricate and delicate, but the spiders....give me the creeps!

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  16. cool, but a bit creapy guys. Beautiful pics! :)

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  17. What at pretty specimen, the two last shots... spiders can be very colorful...

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  18. Such colourful spiders you have over there in the tropics. Interesting that their web making apparatus is on their stomach.

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  19. The second pic. of the spider looks so much like a cartoon character of a cat.
    2 pointed ears - a cute little eyes.
    Appearance of a little tiger cub.
    Can you see it?

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  20. Wow! Those are truly amazing shots. I agree with James about the 2nd one :)

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  21. Great shots of this unusual spider!

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