Thursday, May 31, 2012

Creatures beating the heat

These photos were taken at the middle of our hot and humid environment, temperatures ranging 30-36C. It rained twice however, one in March and one in May. Those unusual sudden rains, that the weather people called thunderstorm rains somehow lessen the heat. But it also increased humidity which might be useful to plants but almost unbearable for mammals. The following photos of butterflies are normally absent during our previous normal dry seasons. The mentioned rains are very rare occurrence but some catterpillars braved to emerge because some shoots grow for them to munch on. A little later, these butterflies emerged unusually through this heat. They are brave enough to beat the heat and waterless environment. Moreover, nectar plants are very few these time.

 This butterfly is very common in our property, Junonoia hedonia. It is not a fast or high flyer, just under the trees and alighting on dried leaves. I am sure it is also a sure environment for it to camouflage its color. I seldom see it alight on the flowers.
 the underside of the first photo

 This one surely had its life about to end, but it still is fast seemingly not affected by the torn wings. Even its scales are already worn-out and the full shades already fading. It was the hottest time of the day, but i really wanted to document the condition of this butterfly, so pathetic but still struggling on!

 Go on butterfly, you are an idol as in IDOL.

 It has been witness to a very harsh dry season. This is my first time to see a butterfly with very dilapidated/torn wings but still coping with life.

 It is still the same weary butterfly, showing the blue sheen of its upper wings. This might be a
Hypolimnas bolina.

 The top and below photos are of two kinds. They have definitely different designs. I wonder if they are different species or just one species but different sexes. Lasippa illigera. (Thanks to Dr. Peter B. Hardy for the ID)

  It is perched with very nice contrast to Heliconia rostrata, which has been blooming already for two months. It is good some butterflies can also get food from them.  Pantoporia nefte or Neptis mindorana, i am not sure as they are almost the same, which i got comparing it with Butterflies of the Philippines book. However, Mr Horace Tan of Butterflies of Singapore identified it as Phaedyma columella. Dr Hardy finally confirmed this is Neptis mindorana.

The above photo of a black unknown insect is perched on a citrus trunk full of lichens.  I also don't know the identity of the insect. It looks like a black ladybug.

Camera Critters





27 comments:

  1. Beautiful photos, especially the coloring of that first one.
    Cher

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  2. Beautiful photos as always Andrea! Fascinating blooms and tropical bugs!

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  3. Thank you for sharing your beautiful photos of the butterflies. Our summer season is just starting so I am looking forward to seeing some butterflies in the garden.

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  4. Always so interesting how the butterflies appear during a brief respite in the weather. The images of the tattered one are so pretty, Andrea.

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  5. Beautiful captures, Andrea, especially the 3rd to 5th photos. The exposure of the background gives it an artistic feel.

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  6. Pretty butterflies but I hate to see them struggle. When we go through a HOT, DRY summer, our plants all suffer. Hubby tries to water things --but can only do so much. We just hope for the next season to get here SOON.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  7. that's really hot. and add the humidity, i'd be really grouchy :)

    i can't remember how i survived all those years in the phil. i do miss the november to february weather though. so ideal.

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    1. Anybody used to the temperate climate will not be able to withstand the heat and humidity during the dry season. In fact, we seldom go out but early morning and late afternoon. You might not be able to have it after living for long in the US.

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  8. In answer to your question on my blog, Andrea ... I love a rainbow of colour! Blue, though, is my favourite, followed by red. No, I'm not an entomologist (I'm a poet, with a particular interest in eco-poetry in all its guises). I am a keen amateur observer of wildlife. The blog helps me learn so much more as I connect with others. However, I did catalogue the fascinating papers of an entomologist many years ago, so perhaps this has something to do with it!

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    1. Thank you so much Caroline for these information. I actually saw you are a poet, but i thought you might also be an entomologist because you know a lot about insects. I felt a little guilt because my course is more related to insects, but i really know so little about them, hahaha! That means if we really are passionate about something, we really learn much about it on our own.

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  9. I'm going to beg to pass on your black beetle, Andrea! It is certainly Ladybird/Ladybug/Ladybeetle-like!

    You might like to look at these black ones here ... who knows, you might spot your among them, but I couldn't actually find a black one from the Philippines. I'll let you know if I do ...

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    1. Caroline, I looked at all the images of Hyporestes postica, and i suddenly realized mine has a bit flat black unlike all the black ladybugs in the net. Maybe mine is not a ladybug at all, hahaha! But i am not hopeless, you certainly inspired me to look for ladybugs!

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  10. Whoops ... that should read 'your one'. Sorry!

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  11. Lovely series! The Heliconia shots are my favourite.

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  12. I like all your flying critters, Andrea. Nice photos.

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  13. What lovely butterflies Andrea...you know I love them and hope to see more here soon...

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  14. Hi Andrea, I like your tattered butterfly and agree that it is a great symbol of endurance. I sometimes see tattered butterflies late in the summer, beaten-up by life, but beautiful nonetheless.

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    1. Hi Jennifer, that is exactly the right words for my butterfly post, a great symbol of endureance, why did i not think of those words! hahaha! thank you

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  15. Your heliconias looks really pretty...

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    1. Hi Lrong, they have been there for already 2 months now, just fading in beauty but lovely still.

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  16. Your photos are beautiful. Thank you for dropping by, Andrea. The cats in my post are mostly client's cats as I have an in-home cat-sitting service. I go to the clients' home. I live with 6 cats and a dog along with my husband. That's enough for me. :-)

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  17. Andrea, your butterflies are beautiful. Wonderful captures. Happy Sunday!

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  18. Gorgeous captures!

    Visiting a little late from Camera Critters, here's my entry, hope you can still take a peek, your comment will be greatly appreciated.

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  19. I really enjoyed all the photos of the butterflies...just beautiful! The colors are amazing!

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  20. That butterfly with broken wings is a survivor.

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Your comments inspire me to post more, and our conversations make life and gardening more meaningful.

However, Anonymous comments and personal back links give me problems, so i don't publish them. Anonymous + back links = SPAM = DELETE

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