Monday, September 19, 2011

Recent Philippine Orchid Show

The recent garden show at the Quezon Memorial Circle in Quezon City almost coincided with my trip to the Tinuy-an Falls in Mindanao. I had to leave the office for a few hours to see the show on its first day. It was a Friday and many people are expected to visit during the weekend. The disadvantage of my early visit was the still unfinished landscaping of the exhibit booths. But the commercial booths are already full of plants and flowers for sale. 


Of course, my main intention is not to buy anything but to take photos. As expected in orchid shows here, the more famous Vanda and Catleya are in exhibit. The pride of the country, the waling-waling or Vanda sanderiana is prominently displayed together with the more unique colors of the famous hybrids. What is also awesome are the endemic species which are in full bloom. These endemics are sought after for collections, which endangered their presence in the wild. I don't miss any orchid show in the city, but i still saw many species for the first time. They are really awesome! Even if I already gave up my orchids, seeing these exhibit make me miss my lost collections. 


These orchids are mounted overhead on natural trees in the park, and we have to look up to appreciate their beauty in their supposedly normal habitat.

This looks like a wall of Trichoglottis sp. Trichoglottis is a genus found in Eastern Asia mainly the Philippines. 

A bunch of  almost leafless canes of Dendrobium bracteosum

Trichoglottis philippinensis 

Oncidium hybrid

Cymbidium hybrid

Dendrochilum magnum (thanks Orchid de Dangao for the lead). Am sorry to not have taken the ID from the tag.

Rhyncostylis retusa (thanks to Orchid de Dangau for the species ID)

Rhynchovola David Sander, commonly known as Brassovola David Sander (Thanks to Orchid de Dangao for giving me the lead with his ID as Bras. David Sanders)

Habenaria myriotricha also known as H. medusae

Dendrobium chrysotoxum ( yes Orchid de Dangau this is D. chrysotoxum)

Grammatophylum scriptum adorned with some palms, ferns and silaginella in front

24 comments:

  1. Really stunning - I'd love to see these grow in the wild :) Great post!

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  2. Lovely flowers. Looks like a really nice day.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  3. That Habenaria is particularly striking!

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  4. Lovely orchids! I guess you can always visit the orchid show again now that they have completed the landscape.

    Which one is your favorite? Mine is the 4th photo.

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  5. Andrea ~ Thank you so much for showing us the orchids from this show. They are beautiful.

    FlowerLady

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  6. Incredible!! There was an orchid sale in San Diego last month in Balboa Park. I didn't buy any because they require too much work here in the desert plus my cats would chew them apart! Beautiful plants and great shots.

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  7. Ahh, orchids.... so gorgeous and magnificent to gaze at especially in their natural habitats and in floral shows, yet so frustrating to be grown... I didn't knew dendrobium had such exotic and weird flowers in the family.

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  8. They are absolutely incredible! I also had the pleaure of visiting a orchid show in a near by town which I will post next week! Spectacular post you have here!

    Veronica
    www.mothercitymagic.blogspot.com

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  9. So many varieties! I have 2 potted orchids in my house, and I never know exactly if and when they'll choose to bloom.

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  10. Sounds like certain orchids are endangered there as they are in Florida. I have never been to a show that had only orchids but I bet I'd love it!

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  11. Beautiful flowers. I too just like looking at and admiring orchid flowers but I don't foresee myself having an orchid garden in the near or far future.

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  12. Amazing varieties of orchids... very beautiful indeed...

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  13. Wonderful pictures Andrea! They are beautiful plants and flowers. Thanks for taking us to the show.
    Randy

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  14. Andrea,

    Must have been really something to see these beauties. And most photographed very nicely.

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  15. Happy Homemaker UK - I am sorry to say they don't grow in the wild anymore because of collectors and poachers. Maybe they are now luxuriously growing in arboretums of advance countries who can provide phytotrons to grow them, and of course in gardens of collectors here in the country.

    Cher of Sunray Gardens - Thank you for visiting, hope you will drop by again.

    Phil - yes, that Habenaria is i think everybody's favorite as it doesn't appear often in shows.

    One - My trip to Tinuy-an Falls was 27 Aug - 01 Sept so the Orchid Show is finished when i got back, that's why i had to see it the first day even if still incomplete. Orchid shows normally lasts for 2 weeks, longer than and the plants already suffer much from the elements.

    FlowerLady - you're welcome, and i appreciate very much your patronage of my posts.

    Chris - orchids shouldn't be placed in areas where pets frequent, in our garden too, my precious Rhynchostyllis' leaves are eaten by goats kids who can reach positions way above its head.

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  16. Aaron - what you are thinking is false, it is easy to take care of orchids as long as you know their specific requirements mainly in terms of light, water and nutrients. Your country, like ours, is very much suited for orchids. Dendrobium is very easy to grow as well as terete Vanda. If you will start, you should not start with Cattleya or Phalaenopsis.

    Veronica - i will wait for that post from your orchid show, thanks for dropping by.

    Barb - as long as you provide them the basic requirements: light, water, nutrients, they will be very happy and produce blooms faster.

    EG Wow - a lot of species are endangered or extinct in our country, and many species can already be seen in Florida, California, etc, haha! It is good if some scientists or collectors here have left some specimens.

    SR - i had for sometime was so engrossed with them and had my own too, however since i dont stay in the farm they either died of old age, given to friends or died of neglect. But i still have a dwindling few, unfertilized, sometimes unwatered, sometimes eaten by goats, etc! What do you expect from the province!

    Lrong - thanks also for visiting here often. I of course love your photos and your tours.

    Randy of pumpkydine - thank you so much for your kind words and appreciation.

    Randy Emitt or rlephoto - i have two Randys now seeing my posts, i love that. You are my IDOL in making gadgets, equipment for the farm, apiarist and butterfly photographer. thanks for your kind words.

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  17. Nice post, enjoy reading. The Oncidium is not Oncidium sp. the correct name is Oncidium Wild Cat, many varieties of this Wild Cat, from your picture, is mostly like Wild Cat 'Bob'. This is hybrid Orchid.
    The 7th picture is Dendrochilum species, the picture not so clear, either Dendrochilum magnum or Dendrochilum cobbianum (sometimes have white and yellow form) and native to Philippine.
    The 8th picture is not the Rhycostylish gigantea, the correct is Rhyncostylish retusa.
    Another missed name on 9th picture is Bras. David Sanders is the hybrid orchid.
    The 11th picture is not Dendrobium aggregatum. The correct name is Dendrobium chrysotoxum. I think the Cymbidium also not the sp. (species)the form and color more to hybrid. Will check and find it and update later. You missed 'i' in the Habenaria myrotricha, the correct is myriotricha. The Grammathophyllum could be Grammathophyllum scriptum 'alba' form.

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  18. Orchid de dangau - thanks very much for your clarifications. I would say because i had very limited time i wasn't able to get most of the ID in tags. When we say "sp.", that means it is a general term denoting the specimen is one of the species in that genus, that is also a sure way for us not to make mistakes. LOL. For the Dendrobium aggregatum, that is actually the label in the tag. For the rest of the leads, i tried to search and put the right term if i can, as in Rhyncovola David Sander. I certainly appreciate your comment.

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  19. Welcome. Sometime the person mistakenly tagged the wrong name. Here I attached the reference between D. aggregatum (also known/ synonyms with D. lindleyi)[http://www.orchidspecies.com/denlindleyi.htm] and D. Chrysotoxum. From the form and the spike obviously show that Dendro is Chrysotoxum (http://www.orchidspecies.com/dendrobiumchrysotoxum.htm)

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  20. Hi Andrea,
    I love the variety of orchids you have in your part of the world. I've never tried to grow any.

    You asked me some questions on my Foliage Follow up post. Yes, we put holes in the bottoms of our tubs and pots.

    I've heard of eating the leaves of sweet potatoes, but have kept forgetting to try them. I did put a few in a stir fry I made yesterday, but not enough to know when I was eating them. Thanks for the tip. I didn't know if it was just the younger leaves, or if any were good. I see you wrote that it's the young ones that are used. I also cut up part of a stem. Do you use the stems, too?

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  21. Gorgeous orchids, and such variety.

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  22. The pictures I took of evening's golden glow in my garden were taken when the sun was still up, but setting, so no special settings were used. And I don't use a tripod, just a steady hand!

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  23. I like the Habenaria myriotricha best! The orchids of your country are beautiful.

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  24. The Habenaria is also my favorite. Are you planning to restart your orchid collection any time soon?
    So nice for the shows to be so near to your place of work.

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