Monday, July 29, 2013

Mellow Yellow

The Horticulture Show early this year captivated my enthusiasm about Hoya, a wax plant, many species of which are endemic in this country. A friend delivered a lecture on hoyas, and he invited me to attend. That was the start of my fascinating affair with the plant. Before that, I am not interested with it, devoted my time in other more common plants, only to find that this is our very own. Out of about more than 200 species now in cultivation around the world, most of them originated from this country with 61 species already named, and still increasing. We need more enthusiasts, hobbyists, conservationists to make our countrymen more aware of our natural resource and protecting it. The lecture stressed on the dwindling presence of hoya in the wild, and many species are not anymore found here but in some expensive collections of foreign nurseries. Hobbyists in the country cannot anymore get expensive plants from these collectors! Can you imagine a plant worth $100 excluding shipping? This is already above our standard capacity to pay for a plant.

After the lecture, cuttings are distributed to participants and some are raffled. I am more privileged or lucky because one of the  Horticulture Society officials gave me 2 already growing plants. She told me this species hooked her to hoya collecting. After a few months, I told her that I replicated her experience. I already have five species growing nicely at home, and I still have a few species already ordered from friend collectors.

 Hoya buotii is named after a professor in the University of the Philippines Los Baños. It is one of the most floriferous hoya species, that hooked me to collect more species.



very small ants love the nectar oozing from the flower

 The hairy parts are called corolla, and the shiny parts on top are called corona. Reproductive parts of the flower are embedded inside the corona.

Unopened blooms within an umbel.

My rooting plants are in recycled soft drink bottles, hanging under the canopy of fruit trees giving them the filtered sunlight. You can see the already 1 meter branch of the Hoya buotii, carrying the blooming umbel. Some spurs where the umbels arise are also present in the newly growing branches. This is about to be replanted in bigger traditional pots.


42 comments:

  1. Wow---that's gorgeous. I've never ever seen a flower like that one. SO unique. That's neat that you have one. Love that yellow color also.

    Hope you are feeling better.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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    1. Yes Betsy, i am glad i introduced something so beautiful to you. Do you know that hoyas are very famous in US, Canada and the Scandinavian countries? Those species already gone here are already in US nurseries! And thanks, I am already much better now!

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  2. i've never seen hoyas this close before. i didn't notice the fuzz until i've seen your photos. these are absolutely gorgeous!

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    1. The fuzz depends on the species Luna, but they are all beautiful. I guess you didn't read the whole story, haha!

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  3. Exquisite, wow, I'm at a loss for words, especially for people who are able to grow them!

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  4. Hello Andrea. Thank you for your visit and your comment. I Love your pics. Well done haha ;D Have a good Start.

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  5. Wonderful looking plants!

    Wide depth of field needs a small aperture - and often you dont need to focus on the nearest object. Also, very wide angle lenses have huge depth of field.

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne:

    PS: ankle will keep me off rough ground for at least another two weeks - sad face!

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  6. Very nice Andrea! Some Hoyas do well in warmer parts of Europe too.

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    1. Yes Mark and Gaz, when i joined the forums and groups i realized that they thrive in very wide range of habitats, and those in Europe and Scandinavia really make greenhouses just for them.

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  7. Wow .........very beautiful,I have no doubt beautiful yellow flowers like (y)

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  8. The hoya is a splendid plant! I have never seen anything like this before! Unique beauty.

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  9. It's a great looking Hoya. What a nice colour!

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  10. That is one very cool looking plant. Like the color also but the plant is really special.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    1. Yes Cher they are special for me, most specially because we lost them already in our wilderness. Thanks for the visit.

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  11. I'm not familiar with Hoya, but it is a beautiful plant and your photos are marvelous. You obviously have a green thumb, judging by the plants you have rooting. Thanks for an interesting and informative post.

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  12. I love how you are rooting your plants. What a great idea for repurposing.
    The Hoya is so beautiful. What fantastic pictures! Those little ants must love the plant too. LOL!

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    1. Thanks Lona, yes that is very good for our conditions and the plants love it without me putting anything but water. The ants love the nectar, and there is scent too.

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  13. Beautiful and unique flower.

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  14. I've grown a Hoya as a houseplant before and loved it. (Had to give it away when we moved.) How cool that many of them are native for you!

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    1. Gaia Gardener, when i joined HOya Groups and forums i realized many temperate country growers are also successful in growing them. Many collectors are from these countries.

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  15. Such interesting flowers - kind of fleshy and hairy!

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  16. U nas te śliczne kwiaty mogą rosnąć tylko w doniczkach w domu. Pozdrawiam.
    You are beautiful flowers can grow only in pots in the house. Yours.

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  17. Those are such unique & beautiful flowers! My sister used to have hoyas in her kitchen that bloomed like this.
    Wonderful macro shots!

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    1. Thanks Amanda for your visit. When i joined the Hoya Groups and forums i realized they tolerate a very wide range of temperatures and a lot of people in Europe, Americas and Scandinavia are collecting hoyas!

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  18. So pretty. I never thought about there being more than one species, I have the one with white and red flowers. A quick search showed me there are many species of Hoya. Enjoy collecting :)

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    1. Hi Melanie, if you read my blogpost i wrote there the >200 species of hoya, that doesn't include the hybrids. Most of them have originated here in our country, but only 61 are already named. Thanks for the visit.

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  19. Awesome macros of this beautiful variety of Hoya!! Wonderful!!

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    1. Thanks Mitchy, i am also very much awed even if it is mine.

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  20. Gorgeous! I haven't seen a yellow hoya before.

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  21. Wow!!! I have only seen the pink hoya blossoms!! I did not know there were so many species!!! I love the images you have posted - so different from mine!!!

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    1. Thanks Judy for your kind words, i hope you come again.

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  22. What a unique flower...they look like fuzzy blooming starfish! Your photography is gorgeous!

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    1. Susie, in the link i went back to, you are called Andrea! Am lost, but thanks for the visit.

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  23. Andrea these look fabulous. I can't wait to see them growing and flowering...love the rooting pots!

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  24. Excellent shots of the Hoya flower...

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  25. Hello Andrea! I too have not been regular with visiting . . . and I do miss you. Thank you so for your very kind words! I love these delicate flowers and the lovely fringe along their edges. Beautiful! Good luck with your plants. Happy August! I hope you and yours are all well too. Carol

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  26. Andrea - Thanks for introducing us to your spectacular native plant. Your propogation technique looks like an attractive arrangement.

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  27. Gosh, that is gorgeous, Andrea. I have never seen a yellow-flowered hoya before. Now, to find one in Nova Scotia....

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  28. I too am loss for words. Never seen these or I would of noticed living in bush country.

    I must keep coming back inot your blog to see what else you have found and kept.

    Your on my list. Just been so trying to catch up wit things and my computer freezing but now it is all fixed but other then me.

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  29. They call me mellow yellow, thats right! Well Andrea, unless you were a Donovan fan back in the 60s you wont have a clue what I am referring to so lets get back to the Hoya! flipping fabulous. If I could grow them here I would spend a hundred bucks on it, don't tell Myra though. Yes I know your too young to remember Donovan..

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  30. So lovely! I've never seen these before! Beautiful shots.

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Your comments inspire me to post more, and our conversations make life and gardening more meaningful.

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