Tuesday, February 3, 2015

A Land of Thousand Temples: Part III

Our hostel in Yangon was chosen not only for the price, but also because of the owner's promptness replying to emails. She was also very helpful and accomodating. Our arrival in Yangon was early in the afternoon, so we had enough time to rest a bit before dinner. Shennoon's House proved to be very nice, cosy and clean. It was just a rented old place remodeled to fit the need for a small guesthouse. Shennoon, the owner, is still very young, single and very pleasant. If ever we want to visit Yangon next time, we will not hesitate staying there again.

The major temple in Yangon, Schwedagon Paya.

The swarm of people visiting Schwedagon Paya on the Full Moon. Other people in farther areas of the country visit temples nearer them, but most prefer visiting this main big temple in Yangon, the capital city of Myanmar. Heavy rains and slippery temple stairs didn't sway the people from leaving home.

 When you are in Bagan, everything around you will be temples, as far as your eyes can see.  This is trully the land of thousand temples.

 Bagan is said to be already being reviewed for the UNESCO Heritage Sites. Despite being approved officially, it is already there in the hearts of the people and tourists who have been to the place, I am included.
Cattles also roam freely in and around the temple sites. Other patches are being cultivated with domestic crops like corn and beans. Those big trees are mostly of the Casia species.

This is the main river, Ayeyawady River, used for transport of goods and services around Myanmar.

Bupaya Temple. Near the bank of the Ayeyawady River, was an old temple claimed to be built in the 3rd century. What is seen now is a complete reconstrucion after the 1975 earthquake that demolished the original.

These woods are Muraya species growing in Central Myanmar, used for making thanaka (spelled thanakha) creams. It is normally applied as circular paste on faces of women and children, but sometimes also for the whole body. It has a mild scent and can give cooling sensation and protect the skin from sunburn.

 
At the left is the stone where the bark is smudged to make the cream paste. At the right is an example of the thanaka on the face. She is not a Burmese woman but my friend companion during our visit. She wants to experience the feelings of a Burmese woman, at least on the face.

My next post will be on Bagan lacquerwares, that survived the centuries.

19 comments:

  1. It's great to follow your adventures Andrea, it looks amazing!

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  2. It's great to follow your adventures Andrea, it looks amazing!

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    1. Thanks for joining me again Mark and Gaz.

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  3. Too much people isn't it? I wonder if they have off season, but with tropical climate it's tough to have off season for tourism.

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    1. That much people is only because of the Full Moon coinciding with our visit. It happens only once a year, i am glad we saw their culture at that moment.

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  4. Thank you for sharing your adventures in such beautiful place

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    1. Hi klaraau01, glad to see you again. I thought i already lost my previous blogging friends. I've been to Sydney and Brisbane last Dec, will post my escapades later. Thanks for comingback here.

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  5. Thanks for joining me again, Mark and Gaz!

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  6. Wonderful part of the world - I landed at Yangon airport once but that is as close as I have got to visiting!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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    1. Stewart, you should come back and explore Bagan, it really is a very fascinating place.

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  7. What an amazing place. It sounds as though you had a great trip.

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    1. Hi Nick thanks for coming back again. Yes it is an amazing place, you should visit it one of these days. You will miss a big part of the world if you wont!

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  8. Andrea I had no idea there were that many temples there....and what a sight...beautiful!

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    1. Oh Donna, the temples are viewed within the 360 degree angle and as far as your eyes can see, so my photos haven't put justice to the real thing.

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  9. Love the temples. The architecture and culture is wonderful.

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    1. Hi Donna, thanks for visiting here again. You should drop by Bagan, Myanmar one of these days, the temples are waiting for you. It is better appreciated in person.

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  10. Wow my blogging friends are coming back, you just dont know how appreciative i am, thank you so much.

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Your comments inspire me to post more, and our conversations make life and gardening more meaningful.

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