Thursday, September 20, 2012

More deja-vu, now to Sweden!

Nobody is spared of knowing Carl Linnaeus, also known as Carl von Linne or Carolus Linnaeus (1707-1778), the Father of Taxonomy. His name is strongly taught to students of all ages since they enter school. Maybe it is a mortal sin for people in the sciences if they don't know his famous name.  He is known most prominently for his binomial classification of living species,  or what we presently call the Scientific name, or Genus species. Every living thing has a name, an identification, that no one in the universe own but himself. Genus is the first name and species is the 2nd name. Genus is written starting with a capital letter and species written in small letters. Scientific names are formally written in italics or underlined. 

 Linnaeus monument beautifully erected inside the Linnaeus Garden at the University of Uppsala

It is reported that Linnaeus started school taking up medicine in the University of Lund, but ended up classifying plants in the University of Uppsala. I love this correlation to our situation, as during our one month stay in Sweden, our base is Lund and ended up later in Uppsala at the end of our stay. (For a thorough discussion about the life of Linnaeus click here)

 The Linnaeus Museum, also located in the garden is separately run by the Swedish Linnaeus Society

gate to Linnaeus Garden and Museum

The Uppsala University Botanical Garden is the oldest botanical garden in Sweden since 1655. The old garden, now known as the Linnaeus Garden, is restored in 1745 in French Style following Linnaeus and Carl Harleman's design. It is reported to be planted to 1300 species of plants according to Linnaeus' classification. There are actually 3 separate Linnaeus Gardens, the other two are the Modern Botanical Garden and the Linnaeus Hammarby. We unfortunately only visited the Linnaeus Garden. 

 center pond inside the garden

The garden is oval and the buildings housing the Linnaeus museum surrounds the garden. We did not enter the museum for lack of time. We were briefed by the garden authority who discussed and entertained questions about Linnaeus and the garden.



 I guess, this small plants and annuals have to be  planted every year to maintain the showcase. We visited at the time when they are mostly newly planted. These can be very beautiful when fully in bloom.

An onion species flowering beautifully during our visit. I just cannot put the Scientific name prominently because i cannot read the label, which i suppose is patterned after Linnaeus' handwriting. Since onions don't flower here, I am not familiar with it, but am also correct, it is an onion species. Now i already know it as chives, Allium schoenoprasum. Thanks to Donna (comment below) for pointing it out as chives.

13 comments:

  1. Hello there:) I remember your lectures the first time I began writing the latin names down:) I sometimes forget so it's always good to get a refresher post. The place is such a "clean" space. Very different from our desert gardens here in Tucson. Hope you are ready for the weekend and have something planned. Chris

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  2. Interesting looking garden Andrea. Sweden is such a beautiful country, all year round :)

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  3. Lovely place to visit. You got some great photos.

    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  4. Those look like chives in the last photo...lots to learn here and I love the gardens.

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    1. Aye yes Donna, it is actually chives. I am not familiar with it, so when i see Allium and can't read the species, i just said its onion. Onions don't flower here too so we just import onion seeds for planting. Now, i searched and clearly show the species. Thanks Donna for pointing it out, i corrected it already.

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  5. A great informative post. It must have been a wonderful experience visiting that garden. The chives are gorgeous.

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    1. Yes Aaron, it is a very lovely experience, as any travel is. But seeing a very significant place and the oldest university is really an achievement.

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  6. It's amazing what lack of winter prevents you from growing, down there in the tropics. I suppose it's my turn now to gloat :) :) :) :) Great post Andrea.

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  7. I wish I could while away my days in a land like this. I would love to be some sort of royalty or something, not have to work, and just stroll the gardens.

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  8. Nice blog you have here. Nice photos of the Linnaeus Garden which I also had the opportunity to visit some years back. Surprised to see a some Linnaues exhibits too in our own National Museum. How do you make all your plants flower profusely? :)

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    1. Hi Corrine, I am not sure if i replied to your email message. We are not as fortunate as you in visiting the Linnaeus museum, we saw only the garden for lack of time. Maybe it is our climate and conditions which make our plants "flower profusely" as you said. But for my standards they are just normal, not doing very well. I actually don't tend to my garden much, they mainly thrive on neglect. For some general tips, as long as you give plants' requirements in terms of light and water, they can get their own nutrients.

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  9. Hi Andrea,
    Your nice blog takes me back to Sweden too.
    I appreciate your attempt to provide interesting information and share beautiful pictures.
    Well done.
    Phongsri

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    1. Hello Phongsri, thanks for visiting my site, i imagine you browsed on most posts and just selected to comment on this one. I tried to look at your blogsite link but there was none there, so i assumed you just register to comment here, haha! I hope you enjoy reading and seeing my photos.

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Your comments inspire me to post more, and our conversations make life and gardening more meaningful.

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