Thursday, March 22, 2012

Plants of Strasbourg

I started posting plants from travels to some temperate countries. Last post was Sweden Plants, now i will post some Strasbourg plants. I am doing this because, as i said earlier, i am a little bit bored with our own. Our plants have been growing there all year in our garden, sometimes after pruning they become lovely again, but not so attractive for me anymore. We can change the plants, but I pity discarding those peacefully growing plants. They are just like pets, giving us beautiful experiences and make our days more interesting, so it pains me to throw them out due to boredom. 


I pacify this inclination to dig and discard by planting some vegetables in another area. However, vegie photos are not as lovely as the colors of the flowering plants. I might sound like too defensive for posting foreign plants, but actually gardeners seem to be like that. We love the uncommon, no matter how common they are in their natural habitat. So the natives become boring after seeing them everyday, while the exotics seem very attractive. We even spend a lot to give proper requirements for our fancied plants. Normal greenhouses and sophisticated phytotrons or arboretum arise to cater to these whims and cravings.  That can be another use for the phrase "someone's thrash is another's treasure"!


Perovskia atriplicifolia or Russian sage, thanks to Gisela of  Guildwood Gardens, Canada for identifying this plant

I wonder if the two photos above are varieties of lavender. I do not remember if i smell their scents though. Please help me identify them, as I only saw them once! (Thanks to Nick of Floral Friday Fotos for the ID of the 2nd photo above, Lavandula angustifolia)

The blue flowers are so lovely, it is planted near the first NOID i call lavender. These are the landscape plants of some research facilities near our hotel. (Thanks to Nick again for the ID of the above as Salvia divinorum.
This is not my advertisement, as this is the grounds in our neighborhood where i took my shots most. I think this is a consulting IT company.

 The roses are flowering profusely although I haven't seen any caretaker gardener visiting around. Whenever i have a few minutes of free time before dinner, i just roam around the vicinity to take some photos.


 The above cluster of flowers is only from a single stem. This is also the first time i see such variety of roses. The one at right is still at the immature bud stage and will eventually blossom like this. I haven't seen this variety also in our hot tropics. 


This is a bushy marginal area on our path to the conference room of the International Space University. The attractive flowers borne on tall stems caught my attention. They are growing wildly in the thicket. Later, i realized this is the famous Buddleia, a favored flower by butterflies. However, i did not see any butterfly hovering on them, during our daily walk through this path.

Among the plants and flowers in this area, this is the most familiar to me, impatiens. I realized it grows in a very wide range of temperatures, as a lot of them grows well in our hot climate in the tropics.
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ff      blumen zum wochenende


28 comments:

  1. Hello, Andrea! I know exactly what you mean about unusual flowers, different to those we normally grow in our own gardens. What grows i your garden is "Exotic" for us, and vice versa for you!

    The second picture is an English Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), but I do not recognise the first one. The third photo looks like an ornamental sage (Salvia divinorum).

    Lovely photos and post! Thank you for participating in Floral Friday Fotos.

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    1. Thanks Nick for the ID, i was actually inclined to put that lavender ID as viewed from the net pictures, but I want to take it from those who really know. Oh so that is salvia too! We have the red one but looks so different.

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  2. That Salvia is just gorgeous. Sorry I can't help with an I.D. of the first plant.

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  3. Beautiful photos Andrea ... The low growing pink roses are what I know as landscape roses ... The are used in my city as street-scape and always add a pretty touch of colour.

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  4. Both the first couple look like Lavender to me and the next is probably a Salvia.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  5. Pretty posies. Impatiens come in a variety of colors; beautiful!

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  6. I too think lavender for the first two photos. There are so many varieties of lavender that the form varies. We grow it here, but not many survive our soils or climate. You really get to do a good bit of travel. I enjoy traveling, but rarely am away from the Falls much. I can understand you loving the uncommon. When a plant is common, it is often not valued as much when you see it day in and day out. I am amazed in the tropics because all the plants are our indoor house plants and to you they are commonplace.

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    1. I don't have opportunity to travel abroad now and i can't personally fund them, LOL. When i see our plants in temperate climes commanding very high price, i silently hope I am the one who sells them, coz i have lots at home. Or somehow i want to give them to my friends, if only it is that easy.

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  7. Beautiful flowers.

    Regards and best wishes

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  8. Gorgeous flowers, Andrea! A very tall Buddelia! The slavia is really pretty! Glad you had some help with the IDs.

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  9. There are a few impatiens that are totally hardy in our area. A certain type is even a nasty weed :)

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  10. It is nice to travel to other areas and see what they have growing there. I get bored with the same old stuff too!!

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  11. I think I know how you feel about becoming bored with the common plants in our own area, but since we have four distinct seasons here in Tennessee, we do get a wide variety of blooming plants over a year. I enjoy seeing flowers from other countries as well -- including your country.

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  12. Dear Andrea, thank you for visited my reflexionblog and now I'm looking to your wonderful Lavendar choice. I've never seen so many different kinds. Lovely shots of wonderful flowers and plants ♥
    Greetings
    moni

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  13. Andrea,
    the first picture shows Perovskia atriplicifolia a.k.a.
    Russian Sage, very attractive to butterflies.
    Great pictures!!
    As a gardener I am always interested to see and
    learn about flora and fauna in other countries.
    - Cheers Gisela.

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    1. Thank you so much Gisela for the ID of my first photo. Most plants i photographed in temperate climes i really wanted to know, and posting here is one of my attempts to personally know them, so i appreciated your visit here.

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  14. Lovely blooms especially those roses Andrea!

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  15. Your flowers are so lovely. Have a great weekend.

    My entry.

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  16. while i'm familiar with all these that you showed today, i'm not on a first name or scientific name basis with them yet :)

    i would think that the first image is sort of a lavender type.

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  17. I know how you feel. It is getting harder and harder for me to find some new plant to appreciate.
    Fortunately, you have your pictures and we both have all the blogs out there to read and enjoy.

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  18. Absolutely gorgeous, Andrea! I do agree with you that we gardeners prefer rare and exotic plants (to them), regardless of its true status in its natural habitat. The lavenders and roses are so pretty!

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  19. Beautiful! I especially like the plant in the second shot.

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  20. thanks for your pretty flowers! must have been a nice trip to strassbourg :)

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    1. Yes Tina, it was a beautiful official visit, but i hoped i had extended time for seeing more of the place. That is a place rich in history and wonders that a short trip only makes you disappointed.

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  21. Well I come too your blog to see pictures of all the tropicals I can barely grow as houseplants, :) none of them are hardy in my climate. It's interesting that lavender is the only plant in this post that is hardy in my garden. We have roses but not that species.

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    1. Hello Melanie, i am sure none of our tropical plant can grow well in your temperate clime, but these are temperate plants which do not grow either in our tropical climate.

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Your comments inspire me to post more, and our conversations make life and gardening more meaningful.

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