Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Wildflowers Again

At the height of our rainy season grasses and weeds also make their profuse appearance. But as the term connotes, they normally mean invasiveness. They are not purposely removed or lessened they just stay, multiply and invade as they wish. If weeds are favored by animals, then they might be cut and carried to the animals, but if not they grow and develop to their full glory.


This Ruellia tuberosa lines the side streets, and i have been posting them before in my previous posts. This time they are not fully blooming yet so i chose only one clump. In a little while there will be a lot of them, by that time i home i will be going home to take the photos.


These grasses are also at the side streets, and they are at different levels of blooming. The purplish hues are when the yellow pollens have already fallen.


A still pollen grain-filled inflorescence

with only a few pollen grains left on the spike, leaving the purplish structures

This is an almost spent inflorescence showing the white structures that will eventually hold the seeds.

16 comments:

  1. Interesting close ups of the Ruellia!

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    1. Thanks Mark and Gaz! I haven't been posting nor visiting for a while as i went on trip.

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  2. this is the time of the year when the grasses are at their greenest and the environment especially in the countryside smells so fresh and clean. i miss it.

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    1. Yes Maria, they are growing en masse once again, i agree with you about the smell of freshness. It really is nostalgic if you already lived in the big city away from home.

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  3. Love the Ruellia! We have a similar variety here and it loves the rainy season!

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    1. Hello Dearesr Kreesh, haven't visited you for a while, i've been out lately. Will see you soon in your site, haha

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  4. It is looking nice and green again Andrea.

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    1. Thanks Nick, at last the rain is here. The problem is we always have the disadvantage of flooding in the big city.

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  5. I love wildflowers and also the different grasses are so beautiful!

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    1. We have lots of wildflowers too, but my problem is the time for shooting them, as most of my limited time at home are devoted to my hoyas.

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  6. Interesting and great closeup photos. It's always interesting to drive around my area and see all the things that grow naturally out in fields here and see those same things sold through nurseries.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  7. Very interesting. This is the second post in a row I've read featuring a Wild Petunia. I hadn't really been aware of them before - now I'll be on the lookout!

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    1. Yes Indie, i guess i've also read the post by Carol in Maydreams Gardens. But she has a different species although they look the same at first glance. Thanks.

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  8. Hi Andrea, I know you are glad to be in the 'rainy season' there.... The 'wildflowers' are gorgeous. Even though we try to keep weeds out of our yards, there are many wooded areas which are not cleared or maintained. In these areas, we see many beautiful wildflowers.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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    1. I've seen how wildflowers behave in cold countries during spring and they are really spectacular. The areas are also wide and just kept going. In the tropics i guess our wildflowers are a less colorful and smaller, most are grasses and they are all considered weeds.

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  9. Love seeing a blue wildflower there.

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