Friday, March 30, 2012

Heliconia rostrata

Heliconia rostrata is native to the north western region of South America, commonly called lobster claw because of the flowers' resemblance to it. It is also profusely growing here in the Philippines and are also popularly used to enhance flower arrangements. 


Ours produce more flowers in February to March, at the start of the dry season. At other times of the year they also flower but not as profusely during these months. After the flowers wilt, the spent stems are better cut to give way to healthier growing follow-up stems. Otherwise the clumps become crowded and untidy.


Ours is a clump growing near the street and the entrance. We remove also some suckers to keep them confined to a smaller area. It has already been here for more than twenty years now, and even with just occasional cutbacks and trimmings, they are still growing beautifully. Everyone passing by never fail to appreciate the profuse blooms. They last for more than a month in that condition, and later turn brown and wilt. 






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39 comments:

  1. Beautiful shots of this magnificent plant, Andrea. We have these growing in tropical areas of Australia, but here in Melbourne the flowering stems are available in florist shops.

    Thank you for your continuing participation inn Floral Friday Fotos!

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  2. I always like to see these claws. You have the most wonderful ones - bright and lots of them. Very beautiful. You have a great weekend Andrea!

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  3. Hi Andrea:) This is one of my favorites from the tropics. I like this plant because it's one of the few things that sticks out in that evergreen landscape:) And it makes an attractive plant around the home. Have some fun this weekend! And PS. Do you have anymore friends with amazing yards?:) Hope you are having some fun. Hugs from Tucson. Chris

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    1. haha, yes i hope i can find some amazing yards next long weekend. I hope to sea some beaches also, maybe i will get some stone shots. Happy weekend and happy birding Kreesh!

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  4. What a unique plant! Love the bright color of the blooms. Thanks for sharing, Paula in Idaho
    http://bucketideasforgardening.blogspot.com/

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  5. Such a fabulous display! They are a truly magnificent sight. I've never ever grown them, despite the fact I live in the tropics. I think it's because of the way the plants look after a few years. They do tend to need a lot of trimming and cleaning up otherwise the dead and dying stems look very unattractive. Now I'm able to spend more time in the garden, I'm starting to think I might like to plant some finally.

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    1. Yes Bernie they become untidy if the spent stems are not removed at once. I love it better than the other Heliconia which easily invades an area. We also have that orange erect one, which I will eventually delete from our area. I know it will be growing profusely more in your area as you have more rains.

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  6. I love the vivid colors of Heliconia. they definitely brightens this part of the street.:p

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  7. What a pretty post!!! Your photos are just lovely! I have never seen this plant before...am so glad to see it now!
    Once again I am just loving the tour of all the gardens that have linked in to my little party! I am so excited to visit each and every post...they are all so inspiring and I am NEVER disappointed! The creative gardens and colorful displays that I am lucky to see are inspirations that I would never have found had I not found each of the gardeners I see online! Thank you so much for sharing your garden with my Friday Flaunt this week...I do hope you will link in again soon!
    This post is being shared on my Tootsie Time Facebook page too just so you are aware.
    (¯`v´¯)
    `*.¸.*´Glenda/Tootsie
    ¸.•´¸.•*¨) ¸.•*¨)
    (¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´ ¸¸.•¨¯`•.

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  8. Cute! I have not seen it here in Norway! We import
    beautiful exotic plants. Now we have colorful Orchids here in Norway!

    Thank you for letting me get to know Heliconia rostrata!
    Have a great weekend.

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  9. Pięknie wyglądają kwiaty zwisające z łodyg. Mają śliczne, żywe kolory. Pozdrawiam ciepło. *** Flowers look beautiful hanging from the stems. They have beautiful, vivid colors. With best wishes.

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  10. What a unique plant. Love the vibrant color.

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    1. Hi Bama Gardener, this is your first visit here, thanks for coming and hope you drop by again.

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  11. Just love the flowers of Heliconias, so exotic!

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  12. Andrea I adore the flowers...my favorite exotic...

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  13. Heliconias are my favourites! Would love to grow them here but it's not an easy task. I even brought seeds from Costa Rica... :-)

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  14. I wasn't familiar with this flower before. It's easy to see why it is called Lobster Claw. I like the color and have to say that it is a beautiful plant when in bloom.

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  15. How beautiful! What a way to greet visitors with that beauty growing at your entrance.

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  16. Spectacular! And you photographed them very well too!

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  17. I heart them a lot. These are so beautiful. I wonder if they come in other colors too, I only see them in red, like this one.

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  18. I've never seen those before, Andrea... Love that color... Beautiful... It does look like a Lobster Claw...

    Have a great weekend.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  19. I often hear complaints that their roots are invasive. Is it true? Do the roots really penetrate deep into the soil or is it the underground stems that seem to grow everywhere?

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    1. It is the underground stems called rhizomes which invades wider areas, and of course every rhizome produces a plant when they emerge from the ground. Then every stem has their own roots.It helps if the spent stems are removed from the clump.

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  20. Heliconias have always had this pull on me... it is sooo beautiful that I wish I can grow it here in Japan... but the cold...

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  21. Very interesting and beautiful!

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  22. Very beautiful, Andrea! About your question on my blog, yes, that's Syzygium cumini. Locally it's known as "jaam". It is also known as "jamun" in other parts of India.

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  23. I seldom see these in the gardens here. I must admit they are pretty flowers, very predominant in the tropics.

    Sorry for this late visit, bn working on 2 photo books and today is the deadline, and I am done for both. I will write more about the rocks in Joshua Tree and most rocks rocks here in the US. Some surfaces are smooth and some are not. Once in a while, I slip, and scrape my knee, only because there are sand in between them.

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  24. Beautiful plant & beautiful pics!

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  25. I love those blooms. So cool. we never see those around here except for in botanical gardens.

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  26. Great looking, bold plant, fabulous photos of it too. I wonder if it could grow it as a houseplant :)

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    1. Yes Melanie, they can grow well in moderate to big containers. However, restrictions will produce shorter plants, which are also very beautiful and cute!

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  27. Andrea, That red is incredible. It is almost neon. It must be nice to have such a colorful display for a month or more.

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  28. Great shots, Andrea. My wife makes sure to have Heliconia in the house when we have guests over. They certainly last way after the dinners we host.

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  29. This is a really fun looking plant. Your art image is quite fun too.

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    1. Thank you Donna, i made it that way because you might find the photos already monotonous, haha!

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  30. I always admire this flower in bouquets!

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